Vintage Italian Majolica Plaque

Vintage Italian Majolica Plaque.

Vintage Italian Majolica Plaque


PRESENTING a Lovely Vintage Italian Majolica Plaque.

Flowers and leaves with a central bird, with yellow, brown, red, blue and green tones on this lead glazed earthenware piece.

Circa 1940.

Unmarked …. but definitely Italian Majolica.

Highly Collectible......perfect condition !

shadow-ornament

 

shadow-ornament

Majolica is a word for painted pottery, whose use is not always precise, and can be confusing. Note the different spellings ("i" and "j"), often confused,[1] and different meanings. It may refer to:

  • Maiolica: Any tin-glazed earthenware with opaque white glaze, decorated with metal oxide enamel colour(s). Frequently prone to flaking and somewhat delicate,[2] reached Italy mid 15th century.[3] Renaissance Italian maiolica became a celebrated art form. Maiolica developed also as faience[4] (in France and various countries), and as delftware (in UK and Netherlands). Known also as tin-glazed pottery.
  • Majolica: Any pottery decorated with coloured lead glazes applied directly to an unglazed body, hard-wearing, typically relief molded. Minton’s Palissy ware,[5] also known as 'Majolica',[6] made with a range of revolutionary new coloured lead glazes, was introduced to the public at the 1851 Exhibition, and later widely copied and mass-produced.
  • Majolica:[7] English tin-glazed earthenware in imitation of Italian Renaissance maiolica [tin-glazed], having an opaque white glaze with fine painted decoration, also named ‘Majolica’, also introduced at the 1851 Exhibition. Very rare. Known also as ‘English tin-glazed majolica’ [tin-glazed].
  • Victorian majolica: Mass-produced and widely available pottery made using coloured lead glazes applied direct to the 'biscuit' body, mostly English, but also European and American, 2nd half of the 19th century.[8] 'Victorian majolica' is also used to refer to the very rare 'English tin-glazed majolica' – tin-glazed pottery made in imitation of the Italian Renaissance maiolica process and style.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Majolica


Lead-glazed earthenware is one of the traditional types of glazed earthenware, which coat the ceramic body and render it impervious to liquids, as terracotta itself is not. The lead glaze is shiny and transparent after firing. Three other traditional techniques are tin-glazed earthenware, which coats the ware with an opaque white glaze suited for colored designs, salt-glazed earthenware such as stoneware, and the feldspathic glazes of Asian porcelain. Modern materials technology has invented new vitreous glazes that do not fall into these traditional categories.

In lead glazes tints provided by impurities render greenish to brownish casts, with aesthetic possibilities that are not easily controlled in the kiln. The Romans used lead glazes for high-quality oil lamps and drinking cups.[1] At the same time in China, green-glazed pottery dating back to the Han period (25–220 AD) gave rise eventually to the sancai or three-color Tang Dynasty ceramics, where the white clay body was coated with a layer of lead glaze and fired at a temperature of 800 degrees C. Lead oxide was the principal flux in the glaze; polychrome effects were obtained by using as coloring agents copper (which turns green), iron (which turns brownish yellow), and less often manganese and cobalt (which turns blue).

Much of Roman technology was lost in the West, but coarse lead-glazed earthenwares were universal in medieval Europe and in Colonial America.[2] In England, lead-glazed Stamford Ware was produced in Stamford, Lincolnshire as early as the ninth century.[3] It was widely traded across Britain and the near continent. In Italy during the 15th century lead-glazed wares were improved by the incremental addition of tin oxides under the influence of Islamic wares imported through Sicily, giving rise to maiolica,[4] which supplanted lead-glazed wares in all but the most rustic contexts. The French 16th-century Saint-Porchaire ware is lead-glazed earthenware; an early European attempt at rivalling Chinese porcelains, it does not properly qualify as faience, which is a refined tin-glazed earthenware. In 16th-century France Bernard Palissy refined lead-glazed earthenware to a high standard. Victorian majolica is predominantly lead-glazed earthenware, introduced by Mintons in the mid-19th century as a revival of "Palissy ware" which soon became known as 'majolica'[5] not to be confused with Minton's rare tin-glaze product[6] also named 'majolica' which is included in the genre 'Victorian Majolica'.

Lead-glazed earthenwares in Britain include the Toby jugs, such as those made in the late 18th century by Ralph Wood the Younger at Burslem, Staffordshire.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead-glazed_earthenware

shadow-ornament

Palissy ware is a 19th-century term for ceramics produced in the style of the famous French potter Bernard Palissy (c. 1510–90), who referred to his own work in the familiar manner as rustique. Palissy's distinctive style of polychrome lead-glazed earthenware in a sombre earth-toned palette, using naturalistic scenes of plants and animals cast from life,[1] was much imitated by other potters both in his own lifetime and especially in the 19th century, when pottery in Palissy's style was produced by Charles-Jean Avisseau of Tours, who rediscovered Palissy's techniques in 1843, his relatives the Landais family of Tours, Georges Pull of Paris, Maurice, and Barbizet.

French Palissy ware dish, 17.7ins., c.1870, maker Barbizet, depicting fish, reptiles, insects and leaves.

Portuguese Palissy ware wall plate 12.2ins., c.1880, maker Jose F Sousa depicting crayfish, mussels, sea urchin and shells.

Portuguese Palissy ware was produced by the potteries of Mafra, Jose A. Cuhna, Alves, José Francisco de Sousa, Cezar, Herculano Elias, and Augusto Baptista de Carvalho.[2] Twentieth-century reproductions are extremely common.[3] it is now difficult to identify which 16th-century works in the rustique manner are actually from Palissy's own workshop except by comparison with either fragments excavated in 1878 from remains of the grotto that he certainly decorated at the Tuileries Palace for Catherine de' Medici, who called him to Paris in 1566[4] or from excavations at the site of his Paris workshop in the Palais du Louvre. Many museums have now become cautious in their attributions.

This distinctive style of pottery is characterized by three-dimensional modeled, often aquatic, animals such as snakes, fish, lizards, frogs, and snails arranged onto large platters (wall plates, wall platters, chargers). Typically, each component is modeled and painted individually.

The name 'Palissy' was also used by Minton & Co for a new range of lead-glazed earthenware: "...what is now known as majolica was a range of vibrantly coloured lead glazes launched in 1849 as Palissy ware. Only later did these become known as majolica ware"

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palissy_ware

shadow-ornament

Vintage Italian Majolica Plaque.

Provenance: From a Private Dealers Collection..

Dimensions:

Condition: Mint.

Price: $50.00. Sale Price Now: $30.00