Vintage George Jones Style Majolica Floral Beehive Cheese Dish

Vintage George Jones Style Majolica Floral Beehive Cheese Dish.

Vintage George Jones Style Majolica Floral Beehive Cheese Dish


PRESENTING a Lovely Vintage George Jones Style Majolica Floral Beehive Cheese Dish……..probably British. Unmarked.

Floral and wicker cover with large handle, on a green floral majolica plate.

Beautiful blue, mustard and green tones on this lead glazed earthenware piece.

Circa 1900.

The plate is not original to the cover….but threy go REALLY well together and are of the same style.

Highly Collectible......perfect condition !

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Majolica is a word for painted pottery, whose use is not always precise, and can be confusing. Note the different spellings ("i" and "j"), often confused,[1] and different meanings. It may refer to:

  • Maiolica: Any tin-glazed earthenware with opaque white glaze, decorated with metal oxide enamel colour(s). Frequently prone to flaking and somewhat delicate,[2] reached Italy mid 15th century.[3] Renaissance Italian maiolica became a celebrated art form. Maiolica developed also as faience[4] (in France and various countries), and as delftware (in UK and Netherlands). Known also as tin-glazed pottery.
  • Majolica: Any pottery decorated with coloured lead glazes applied directly to an unglazed body, hard-wearing, typically relief molded. Minton’s Palissy ware,[5] also known as 'Majolica',[6] made with a range of revolutionary new coloured lead glazes, was introduced to the public at the 1851 Exhibition, and later widely copied and mass-produced.
  • Majolica:[7] English tin-glazed earthenware in imitation of Italian Renaissance maiolica [tin-glazed], having an opaque white glaze with fine painted decoration, also named ‘Majolica’, also introduced at the 1851 Exhibition. Very rare. Known also as ‘English tin-glazed majolica’ [tin-glazed].
  • Victorian majolica: Mass-produced and widely available pottery made using coloured lead glazes applied direct to the 'biscuit' body, mostly English, but also European and American, 2nd half of the 19th century.[8] 'Victorian majolica' is also used to refer to the very rare 'English tin-glazed majolica' – tin-glazed pottery made in imitation of the Italian Renaissance maiolica process and style.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Majolica


Lead-glazed earthenware is one of the traditional types of glazed earthenware, which coat the ceramic body and render it impervious to liquids, as terracotta itself is not. The lead glaze is shiny and transparent after firing. Three other traditional techniques are tin-glazed earthenware, which coats the ware with an opaque white glaze suited for colored designs, salt-glazed earthenware such as stoneware, and the feldspathic glazes of Asian porcelain. Modern materials technology has invented new vitreous glazes that do not fall into these traditional categories.

In lead glazes tints provided by impurities render greenish to brownish casts, with aesthetic possibilities that are not easily controlled in the kiln. The Romans used lead glazes for high-quality oil lamps and drinking cups.[1] At the same time in China, green-glazed pottery dating back to the Han period (25–220 AD) gave rise eventually to the sancai or three-color Tang Dynasty ceramics, where the white clay body was coated with a layer of lead glaze and fired at a temperature of 800 degrees C. Lead oxide was the principal flux in the glaze; polychrome effects were obtained by using as coloring agents copper (which turns green), iron (which turns brownish yellow), and less often manganese and cobalt (which turns blue).

Much of Roman technology was lost in the West, but coarse lead-glazed earthenwares were universal in medieval Europe and in Colonial America.[2] In England, lead-glazed Stamford Ware was produced in Stamford, Lincolnshire as early as the ninth century.[3] It was widely traded across Britain and the near continent. In Italy during the 15th century lead-glazed wares were improved by the incremental addition of tin oxides under the influence of Islamic wares imported through Sicily, giving rise to maiolica,[4] which supplanted lead-glazed wares in all but the most rustic contexts. The French 16th-century Saint-Porchaire ware is lead-glazed earthenware; an early European attempt at rivalling Chinese porcelains, it does not properly qualify as faience, which is a refined tin-glazed earthenware. In 16th-century France Bernard Palissy refined lead-glazed earthenware to a high standard. Victorian majolica is predominantly lead-glazed earthenware, introduced by Mintons in the mid-19th century as a revival of "Palissy ware" which soon became known as 'majolica'[5] not to be confused with Minton's rare tin-glaze product[6] also named 'majolica' which is included in the genre 'Victorian Majolica'.

Lead-glazed earthenwares in Britain include the Toby jugs, such as those made in the late 18th century by Ralph Wood the Younger at Burslem, Staffordshire.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead-glazed_earthenware

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George Jones

Majolica produced by George Jones rivals that of Minton and Wedgwood in both design and workmanship. Jones was the youngest of nine children from a family with no connection to the pottery industry. At age fourteen, he commenced a seven year apprenticeship with Minton and upon completion in 1844 worked as a travelling salesman for Wedgwood. Little is known of his output during those years or of any associations he may have had with the renowned modelers of those firms. By 1850 he had established himself as a successful china merchant in Stoke-on-Trent. It was not until 1862 that George Jones entered the pottery manufacturing business with the acquisition of the Bridge works, producing white granite wares. In 1864, Jones purchased parcels of land from Colin Minton Campbell of the Minton factory for construction of the Trent Potteries, which was completed in late 1865. It was in this new and efficient pottery works that George Jones commenced production of majolica in 1866. By 1873 Jones eldest two sons, Frank Ralph and George Henry Jones had become familiar with the business and joined their father in partnership. The firm was retitled George Jones & Sons and the name “Crescent” was registered as the trademark of the new company. At the time, the firm employed 590 skilled workers. Following George Jones’ death in 1893, the family firm saw continued success until the early twentieth century. The company was sold to managing director Walter Bakewell in 1929 and by 1951 the trade name George Jones & Sons was no longer used. The Crescent works was demolished in 1959 after nearly a century of ceramic production.

George Jones won a medal at the Paris Exhibition in 1867 and received acclaim at exhibitions in London (1871), Vienna (1873) and Sydney (1876). The firm advertised majolica in the Pottery Gazette from 1881 to 1886. Some of our knowledge of George Jones & Sons majolica designs comes from annotated pattern books which have survived and now reside in the Wedgwood Museum. Fortunately, much of the firm’s majolica production was also marked and the distinctive mottled brown and green undersurface glazing of Jones majolica allows attribution of other unmarked pieces. The firm produced a very large amount of majolica which is still available to collectors. Being of uniformly high quality, the pieces are also among the more expensive.

George Jones produced a broad array of majolica wares. Their most successful pattern was likely the Apple Blossom which is sometimes erroneously called Dogwood. The design was adapted to a variety of shapes including small and full-sized cheese keepers, a tea service and graduated pitchers. Calla Lily and Pond Lily patterns were likewise utilized in a number of different shapes. Many pieces are decorated with an ochre twisted rope trim with pointed acanthus leaves. Naturalistic themes predominate, and precisely, but artistically modeled flora and fauna add to the unique charm of George Jones majolica. Among the most prized for collectors are covered dishes including cheese keepers, game pie dishes and sardine boxes. Particularly important is a game pie dish with rabbits molded in relief about the base and the cover decorated with a nesting game bird which forms the handle. The piece was produced both with and without a brood of chicks surrounding the hen. Other covered pieces are festooned with foxes, pastoral cows and water birds. Some successful covered designs were produced in a variety of colors including turquoise, pink and cobalt with complementing interior colors. Also important are a series of fruit compotes composed of a turquoise bowl supported by a gnarled oak trunk, each with different animal figures surrounding the base which were allegorical of the continents. The Victorian whimsical sense of humor is enshrined in the design of a punch bowl produced in several colors with the bowl supported by the supine comedic figure Punch.

Early George Jones majolica was marked with the impressed superimposed letters GJ contained within a circle. In 1873, a crescent inscribed with “& SONS” was added beneath the initials. Many pieces also have a small unglazed area or “thumbprint” which has a pattern number written in black ink. Rarely seen is a raised bilobed cartouche with STOKE ON TRENT below the initials and the pattern number in ink above. Many pieces also bear a British registry mark.

Link: http://majolicasociety.com/george-jones/

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Vintage George Jones Style Majolica Floral Beehive Cheese Dish.

Provenance: From a Private Dealers Collection..

Dimensions:

Condition: Mint.

Price: $200.00. Sale Price Now: $120.00