Early 20C American Nouveau Magazine Rack Console

PRESENTING a FABULOUS and RARE Early 20C American Nouveau Magazine Rack Console.

I have never seen another quite like this.

Made of mahogany with lovely natural patina.

It is based upon the earlier concept of a ‘Canterbury’ from the English Regency Era for holding magazines and/or books.

It has features that one would expect from the American Empire style in the legs, arms and cross-supports, a Chippendale feel to the scalloped edge to the console top and a DEFINITE Art Nouveau feel to the fretwork partitions for holding the magazines.

Unlike other ‘Canterbury’ designs this one is a major improvement in my humble opinion.

The “V” shape to the bin holding the magazines means that the bindings face upwards at an angle making it easier to identify the magazine you want and easy to lift and replace.

The bin is separated into 5 sections for display with 4 Nouveau fretwork partitions in the bin in addition to the 2 on either end.

Another EXCELLENT use of this console would be to use it for your ‘VINYL’ Collection !!!

It is the combination of styles and patina that lead me to the opinion that this is very early 20th Century, circa 1900.

The American Empire Style had a brief revival circa 1890 and the height of the Art Nouveau Era was from 1890 to 1910.


American Empire is a French-inspired Neoclassical style of American furniture and decoration that takes its name and originates from the Empire style introduced during the First French Empire period under Napoleon’s rule. It gained its greatest popularity in the U.S. after 1820 and is considered the second, more robust phase of the Neoclassical style, which earlier had been expressed in the Adam style in Britain and Louis Seize, or Louis XVI, in France. As an early-19th-century design movement in the United States, it encompassed architecturefurniture and other decorative arts, as well as the visual arts.

In American furniture, the Empire style was most notably exemplified by the work of New York cabinetmakers Duncan Phyfe and Paris-trained Charles-Honoré Lannuier. Other major furniture centers renowned for regional interpretations of the American Empire style were BostonPhiladelphia, and Baltimore. Many examples of American Empire cabinetmaking are characterized by antiquities-inspired carving, gilt-brass furniture mounts, and decorative inlays such as stamped-brass banding with egg-and-dart, diamond, or Greek-key patterns, or individual shapes such as stars or circles.

The most elaborate furniture in this style was made around 1815-25, often incorporating columns with rope-twist carving, animal-paw feet, anthemion, stars, and acanthus-leaf ornamentation, sometimes in combination with gilding and vert antique (antique green, simulating aged bronze). The Red Room at the White House is a fine example of American Empire style. A simplified version of American Empire furniture, often referred to as the Grecian style, generally displayed plainer surfaces in curved forms, highly figured mahogany veneers, and sometimes gilt-stencilled decorations. Many examples of this style survive, exemplified by massive chests of drawers with scroll pillars and glass pulls, work tables with scroll feet and fiddleback chairs. Elements of the style enjoyed a brief revival in the 1890s with, particularly, chests of drawers and vanities or dressing tables, usually executed in oak and oak veneers.

This Americanized interpretation of the Empire style continued in popularity in conservative regions outside the major metropolitan centers well past the mid-nineteenth century.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Empire_style


Art Nouveau (/ˌɑːrt nuːˈvoʊ, ˌɑːr/; French: [aʁ nuvo]) is an international style of art, architecture and applied art, especially the decorative arts, known in different languages by different names: Jugendstil in GermanStile Liberty in ItalianModernisme in Catalan, etc. In English it is also known as the Modern Style (not to be confused with Modernism and Modern architecture). The style was most popular between 1890 and 1910.[1] It was a reaction against the academic arteclecticism and historicism of 19th century architecture and decoration. It was often inspired by natural forms such as the sinuous curves of plants and flowers.[2] Other characteristics of Art Nouveau were a sense of dynamism and movement, often given by asymmetry or whiplash lines, and the use of modern materials, particularly iron, glass, ceramics and later concrete, to create unusual forms and larger open spaces.[3]

One major objective of Art Nouveau was to break down the traditional distinction between fine arts (especially painting and sculpture) and applied arts. It was most widely used in interior design, graphic arts, furniture, glass art, textiles, ceramics, jewelry and metal work. The style responded to leading 19-century theoreticians, such as French architect Eugène-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc (1814–1879) and British art critic John Ruskin (1819–1900). In Britain, it was influenced by William Morris and the Arts and Crafts movement. German architects and designers sought a spiritually uplifting Gesamtkunstwerk (“total work of art”) that would unify the architecture, furnishings, and art in the interior in a common style, to uplift and inspire the residents.[3]

The first Art Nouveau houses and interior decoration appeared in Brussels in the 1890s, in the architecture and interior design of houses designed by Paul HankarHenry Van de Velde, and especially Victor Horta, whose Hôtel Tassel was completed in 1893.[4][5][6] It moved quickly to Paris, where it was adapted by Hector Guimard, who saw Horta’s work in Brussels and applied the style for the entrances of the new Paris Metro. It reached its peak at the 1900 Paris International Exposition, which introduced the Art Nouveau work of artists such as Louis Tiffany. It appeared in graphic arts in the posters of Alphonse Mucha, and the glassware of René Lalique and Émile Gallé.

From Belgium and France, it spread to the rest of Europe, taking on different names and characteristics in each country (see Naming section below). It often appeared not only in capitals, but also in rapidly growing cities that wanted to establish artistic identities (Turin and Palermo in Italy; Glasgow in Scotland; Munich and Darmstadt in Germany), as well as in centres of independence movements (Helsinki in Finland, then part of the Russian Empire; Barcelona in CataloniaSpain).

By 1910, Art Nouveau’s influence was fading. It was replaced as the dominant European architectural and decorative style first by Art Deco and then by Modernism.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Nouveau


Early 20C American Nouveau Magazine Rack Console.

Provenance: From a Private Dallas Estate.

Condition: Very good original condition.

Dimensions: 33.5″ Tall, 36.5″ Wide, 15.5″ Deep at Bin and Console top is 8.75″ Deep.

PRICE Now: $1,250

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