Art Deco Kashmir Sapphire (1k each) & (2ct each) White Diamonds on Platinum Pair of Earrings

Art Deco Kashmir Sapphire (1k each) & (2ct each) White Diamonds on Platinum Pair of Earrings.



Art Deco Kashmir Sapphire (1k each) & (2ct each) White Diamonds on Platinum Pair of Earrings

PRESENTING one of the FINEST pieces from our Fine Jewelry Collection…………an Art Deco Kashmir Sapphire (1k each) & (2ct each) White Diamonds on Platinum Pair of Earrings.

This piece is an Art Deco piece….probably circa 1930.

It does not bear a makers mark but was UNDOUBTEDLY made by one of the very best jewelers of the time.

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It is marked for Platinum.

The piece is flower shaped and the central old cut Kashmir Sapphire of approximately 1ct on each earring....total 2 ct.

The flower portion of the ring is made of brilliant white diamonds set in platinum.....total circa 2ct each....total 4ct.

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This is a STUNNING piece of Art Deco Jewelry of the HIGHEST QUALITY !

 

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Art Deco Kashmir Sapphire (1k each) & (2ct each) White Diamonds on Platinum Pair of Earrings.

The setting is platinum and it is profusely set with the most GLORIOUSLY BRILLIANT WHITE AND PURE DIAMONDS you will ever see !

The piece cost the private collector from New York a substantial sum in the 1970's.

It was purchased by her from a Fine Jeweler based in Manhattan and Long Island.

This jeweler would visit her at her home in Long Island on a weekly basis to show her fine pieces that she may have been interested in purchasing.

This is why she collected such a FINE RANGE OF HIGH QUALITY AND RARE JEWELRY.

Note: The Ring seen in the photos is being sold separately.

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Sapphire is a gemstone variety of the mineral corundum, an aluminium oxide (α-Al2O3). Whilst typically associated with the color blue, natural "fancy" sapphires also occur in yellow, purple, orange, and green colors; "parti sapphires" show two or more colors. The only color which sapphire cannot be is red - as red colored corundum is called ruby,[2] another corundum variety.

Trace amounts of elements such as iron, titanium, chromium, copper, or magnesium present during formation are responsible for the color of a sapphire. Chromium impurities in corundum yield a pink hue.

Commonly, natural sapphires are cut and polished into gemstones and worn in jewelry. They also may be created synthetically in laboratories for industrial or decorative purposes in large crystal boules.

Because of the remarkable hardness of sapphires – 9 on the Mohs scale (the third hardest mineral, after diamond at 10 and moissanite at 9.5) – sapphires are also used in some non-ornamental applications, such infrared optical components; high-durability windows; wristwatch crystals and movement bearings; and very thin electronic wafers, which are used as the insulating substrates of very special-purpose solid-state electronics (especially integrated circuits and GaN-based LEDs).

Sapphire is the birthstone for September and the gem of the 5th and 45th anniversaries.

Blue sapphire

Pear-shaped blue sapphire

Color in gemstones breaks down into three components: hue, saturation, and tone. Hue is most commonly understood as the "color" of the gemstone. Saturation refers to the vividness or brightness of the hue, and tone is the lightness to darkness of the hue.[6] Blue sapphire exists in various mixtures of its primary (blue) and secondary hues, various tonal levels (shades) and at various levels of saturation (vividness).

Blue sapphires are evaluated based upon the purity of their primary hue. Purple, violet, and green are the most common secondary hues found in blue sapphires.[7] Violet and purple can contribute to the overall beauty of the color, while green is considered to be distinctly negative. Blue sapphires with up to 15% violet or purple are generally said to be of fine quality. Blue sapphires with any amount of green as a secondary hue are not considered to be fine quality. Gray is the normal saturation modifier or mask found in blue sapphires. Gray reduces the saturation or brightness of the hue, and therefore has a distinctly negative effect.[7]

The color of fine blue sapphires may be described as a vivid medium dark violet to purplish blue where the primary blue hue is at least 85% and the secondary hue no more than 15%, without the least admixture of a green secondary.

Sapphires are mined from alluvial deposits or from primary underground workings. Commercial mining locations for sapphire and ruby include (but are not limited to) the following countries: Afghanistan, Australia, Myanmar/Burma, Cambodia, China, Colombia, India, Kenya, Laos, Madagascar, Malawi, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, United States, and Vietnam. Sapphires from different geographic locations may have different appearances or chemical-impurity concentrations, and tend to contain different types of microscopic inclusions. Because of this, sapphires can be divided into three broad categories: classic metamorphic, non-classic metamorphic or magmatic, and classic magmatic.[31]

Sapphires from certain locations, or of certain categories, may be more commercially appealing than others,[32] particularly classic metamorphic sapphires from Kashmir, Burma, or Sri Lanka that have not been subjected to heat-treatment.[33][34][35]

The Logan sapphire, the Star of India, and the Star of Bombay originate from Sri Lankan mines. Madagascar is the world leader in sapphire production (as of 2007) specifically its deposits in and around the town of Ilakaka.[36] Prior to the opening of the Ilakaka mines, Australia was the largest producer of sapphires (such as in 1987).[37] In 1991 a new source of sapphires was discovered in Andranondambo, southern Madagascar. That area has been exploited for its sapphires started in 1993, but it was practically abandoned just a few years later—because of the difficulties in recovering sapphires in their bedrock.[38]

In North America, sapphires have been mined mostly from deposits in Montana: fancies along the Missouri River near Helena, Montana, Dry Cottonwood Creek near Missoula, Montana, and Rock Creek near Philipsburg, Montana. Fine blue Yogo sapphires are found at Yogo Gulch west of Lewistown, Montana.[39] A few gem-grade sapphires and rubies have also been found in the area of Franklin, North Carolina.[40]

The sapphire deposits of Kashmir are still well known in the gem industry,[41] despite the fact that the peak production from this area mostly took place in a relatively short period at the end of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.[42] Kashmir-origin contributes meaningfully to the value of a sapphire, and most corundum of Kashmir origin can be readily identified by its characteristic silky appearance and exceptional hue.[43] At present, the world record price-per-carat for sapphire at auction was achieved by a sapphire from Kashmir in a ring, which sold for approximately $242,000 per carat (more than $6.74 million in total, including buyer's premium) in October 2015.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sapphire


If you are the type of person that likes to acquire ONLY THE FINEST THINGS and in particular jewelry that would have been fit to grace any of the top jewelry houses in the World, then this (and the Collections many other pieces) is for you !

CHECK OUT THE SAPPHIRE AND DIAMOND RING ALSO IN THIS COLLECTION....TO MAKE A SET !!

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KINDLY PLEASE NOTE:

For Security Reasons and because of the value of this (and all our other jewelry) WE DO NOT KEEP ANY JEWELRY AT OUR SHOWROOMS.

All our jewelry is held in a safety deposit box in a Dallas Bank.

It is for this reason, that we require any interested buyer to:

(1) contact us in advance, giving 48 hours notice of a potential viewing,

(2) clearly indicate the piece or pieces they are interested in viewing, and

(3) agree on a mutually agreeable viewing 'venue', suitable and secure for any such viewing.

In the event of agreeing to purchase........possession of the piece will not be given over to the purchaser until such time as 'funds' have FULLY CLEARED in our Bank Account.

PERSONAL & INTERNET SALES: The onus is entirely on the buyer to verify the authenticity of the piece and its description by us.

We have used our best endeavors to describe the items correctly, based on the information provided to us.

In some cases, we will provide the buyer with a professional Certificate of Authenticity and appraisal report.

Where we have such a Report we will post in online on our Website in the individual item's post.

Internet Buyers who purchase, without viewing, do so entirely at their own risk without further recourse to us the Seller.

ANY SALE OVER $3,000 USD CANNOT BE COMPLETED BY PayPal or Credit Card and can only be completed by CASH, CASHIERS CHECK or BANK TRANSFER.

SALES UNDER $3,000 USD CAN BE COMPLETED BY PayPal or Credit Card.

By clicking and using the PayPal Button for items over $3,000 will be treated as a non-refundable deposit on items, with the balance to be discharged as per agreement on form of payment by email.

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Art Deco Kashmir Sapphire (1k each) & (2ct each) White Diamonds on Platinum Pair of Earrings.

Provenance: From our PRIVATE FINE JEWELRY COLLECTION.

Price: $25,000.00. Sale Price Now: $20,000.00

 

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