19C British 8 Day Fusee Railway or School Wall Clock

19C British 8 Day Fusee Railway or School Wall Clock.



19C British 8 Day Fusee Railway or School Wall Clock

Really good British wall clock…..made circa 1880 for use in a Railway Station House or a School House.

THIS IS A SUPERB CLOCK !!!

Made by a well known London maker.....'Walker' of New Bond Street.

This is an 8 day fusee pendulum clock.

Great Condition……the face and case are perfect…..the interior clock mechanism is fully complete and in great condition.

It only needs a simple service to be fully operational.

The case is mahogany.

19C British 8 Day Fusee Railway or School Wall Clock.

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STATION CLOCKS: A station clock is a clock at a railway station that provides a standard indication of time to both passengers and railway staff.

A railway station will often have several station clocks. They can be found in a clock tower, in the booking hall or office, on the concourse, inside a train shed, on or facing the station platforms, or elsewhere.
The design of station clocks in Europe was formerly quite diverse. Today, the majority of them are derived from the Swiss railway clock designed by Hans Hilfiker, a Swiss engineer, in 1944 when he was an employee of the Swiss Federal Railways SBB CFF FFS.[1] In 1953, Hilfiker added a red second hand to its design in the shape of a railway guard's signaling disc. The technical implementation of the railway clock, the central synchronization by a master clock, was engineered together with Mobatime, a clock manufacturer still producing the Swiss railway clock as well as the German railway clock besides many others.[2][3]

Modern European station standard station clock designs have a white clock face that is illuminated in the dark, bar shaped black coloured marks or scales, but no numbers, at the periphery of the clock face dial, and bar-shaped hour and minute hands, also coloured black. The second hand on these standard designs is a thin bar, thickened or fitted with a disc at the peripheral end, and often coloured red. Such clock designs are easily legible from a distance.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Station_clock


RAILWAY TIME: Railway time was the standardised time arrangement first applied by the Great Western Railway in England in November 1840, the first recorded occasion when different local times were synchronised and a single standard time applied. Railway time was progressively taken up by all railway companies in Great Britain over the following two to three years. The schedules by which trains were organised and the times station clocks displayed was brought in line with the local time for London or "London Time", the time set at Greenwich by the Royal Observatory, which was already widely known as Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

The development of railway networks in North America in the 1850s,[1] India in around 1860,[2] and in Europe prompted the introduction of standard time influenced by geography, industrial development and political governance.

The key purpose behind introducing railway time was twofold: to overcome the confusion caused by having non-uniform local times in each town and station stop along the expanding railway network and to reduce the incidence of accidents and near misses, which were becoming more frequent as the number of train journeys increased.

The railway companies sometimes faced concerted resistance from local people who refused to adjust their public clocks to bring them into line with London Time. As a consequence two different times would be displayed in the town and in use, with the station clocks and the times published in train timetables differing by several minutes from that on other clocks. Despite this early reluctance, railway time rapidly became adopted as the default time across the whole of Great Britain, although it took until 1880 for the government to legislate on the establishment of a single Standard Time and a single time zone for the country.[3]

Some contemporary commentators referred to the influence of railway time on encouraging greater precision in daily tasks and the demand for punctuality.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railway_time

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19C British 8 Day Fusee Railway or School Wall Clock.

Dimensions: 15" Diameter on Clock Face and  5.5" Deep

Provenance: Bought privately in Ireland

Conditional: Case and dial are mint. Fusee movement fully intact. It simply needs servicing to become fully operational.

Price: $3,500.00. Sale Price Now: $2,250.00

 

 

19C British 8 Day Fusee Railway or School Wall Clock (5)

19C English Station House or School House Wall Clock

19C British 8 Day Fusee Railway or School Wall Clock (2)

19C British 8 Day Fusee Railway or School Wall Clock (3)

19C British 8 Day Fusee Railway or School Wall Clock (4)

 

19C British 8 Day Fusee Railway or School Wall Clock