19C American Rosewood and Inlaid Regulator Wall Clock

19C American Rosewood and Inlaid Regulator Wall Clock.



19C American Rosewood and Inlaid Regulator Wall Clock

Gorgeous American 19th Century Timepiece…… with an IRISH CONNECTION!!.

Made from rosewood and beautifully inlaid with various wood patterns of satinwood etc. In the style of Tunbridge ware.

Lovely hand painted glass gallery to front with window for watching the brass pendulum movement behind it.

The Dial is painted metal with Roman Numerals for time and in SUPERB CONDITION !

Pendulum operated…..believed to be from a Chicago Maker.

The dial is encased in a brass and glass circular cover which has a catch on the side to keep in position. Release the catch to open.

Acanthus leaf carvings on either side of the clock.

Great Condition for a Wall Clock from circa 1880.



This was a real quality item when first made !!


It made its way across the Atlantic to Ireland....only to return to its Homeland over 100 years later.....how cool is that ??

Inscribed on the back "Mr. Michael Healy, Ahaskra, Dunmanway" which is a Village in County Cork, Ireland.......obviously the man who imported it.

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PENDULUM CLOCK: A pendulum clock is a clock that uses a pendulum, a swinging weight, as its timekeeping element. The advantage of a pendulum for timekeeping is that it is a harmonic oscillator; it swings back and forth in a precise time interval dependent on its length, and resists swinging at other rates. From its invention in 1656 by Christiaan Huygens until the 1930s, the pendulum clock was the world's most precise timekeeper, accounting for its widespread use.[1][2] Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries pendulum clocks in homes, factories, offices and railroad stations served as primary time standards for scheduling daily life, work shifts, and public transportation, and their greater accuracy allowed the faster pace of life which was necessary for the Industrial Revolution.

Pendulum clocks must be stationary to operate; any motion or accelerations will affect the motion of the pendulum, causing inaccuracies, so other mechanisms must be used in portable timepieces. They are now kept mostly for their decorative and antique value.
The pendulum clock was invented in 1656 by Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens, and patented the following year. Huygens contracted the construction of his clock designs to clockmaker Salomon Coster, who actually built the clock. Huygens was inspired by investigations of pendulums by Galileo Galilei beginning around 1602. Galileo discovered the key property that makes pendulums useful timekeepers: isochronism, which means that the period of swing of a pendulum is approximately the same for different sized swings.[3][4] Galileo had the idea for a pendulum clock in 1637, which was partly constructed by his son in 1649, but neither lived to finish it.[5] The introduction of the pendulum, the first harmonic oscillator used in timekeeping, increased the accuracy of clocks enormously, from about 15 minutes per day to 15 seconds per day[6] leading to their rapid spread as existing 'verge and foliot' clocks were retrofitted with pendulums.
A lantern clock that has been converted to use a pendulum. To accommodate the wide pendulum swings caused by the verge escapement, "wings" have been added on the sides
Mantel clock (around 1800) by Julien Béliard, Paris, maître horloger recorded on the rue Saint-Benôit and rue Pavée in 1777, still active in 1817, or Julien-Antoine Béliard, maître horloger in 1786, recorded on the rue de Hurepoix, 1787–1806.

These early clocks, due to their verge escapements, had wide pendulum swings of up to 100°. In his 1673 analysis of pendulums, Horologium Oscillatorium, Huygens showed that wide swings made the pendulum inaccurate, causing its period, and thus the rate of the clock, to vary with unavoidable variations in the driving force provided by the movement. Clockmakers' realization that only pendulums with small swings of a few degrees are isochronous motivated the invention of the anchor escapement around 1670, which reduced the pendulum's swing to 4–6°.[7] The anchor became the standard escapement used in pendulum clocks. In addition to increased accuracy, the anchor's narrow pendulum swing allowed the clock's case to accommodate longer, slower pendulums, which needed less power and caused less wear on the movement. The seconds pendulum (also called the Royal pendulum), 0.994 m (39.1 in) long, in which each swing takes one second, became widely used in quality clocks. The long narrow clocks built around these pendulums, first made by William Clement around 1680, became known as grandfather clocks. The increased accuracy resulting from these developments caused the minute hand, previously rare, to be added to clock faces beginning around 1690.[8]

The 18th and 19th century wave of horological innovation that followed the invention of the pendulum brought many improvements to pendulum clocks. The deadbeat escapement invented in 1675 by Richard Towneley and popularized by George Graham around 1715 in his precision "regulator" clocks gradually replaced the anchor escapement[9] and is now used in most modern pendulum clocks. Observation that pendulum clocks slowed down in summer brought the realization that thermal expansion and contraction of the pendulum rod with changes in temperature was a source of error. This was solved by the invention of temperature-compensated pendulums; the mercury pendulum by George Graham in 1721 and the gridiron pendulum by John Harrison in 1726.[10] With these improvements, by the mid-18th century precision pendulum clocks achieved accuracies of a few seconds per week.

Until the 19th century, clocks were handmade by individual craftsmen and were very expensive. The rich ornamentation of pendulum clocks of this period indicates their value as status symbols of the wealthy. The clockmakers of each country and region in Europe developed their own distinctive styles. By the 19th century, factory production of clock parts gradually made pendulum clocks affordable by middle-class families.

During the Industrial Revolution, daily life was organized around the home pendulum clock. More accurate pendulum clocks, called regulators, were installed in places of business and used to schedule work and set other clocks. The most accurate, known as astronomical regulators, were used in observatories for astronomy, surveying, and celestial navigation. Beginning in the 19th century, astronomical regulators in naval observatories served as primary standards for national time distribution services.[11] From 1909, US National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the US time standard on Riefler pendulum clocks, accurate to about 10 milliseconds per day. In 1929 it switched to the Shortt-Synchronome free pendulum clock before phasing in quartz standards in the 1930s.[12] [13] With an error of around one second per year, the Shortt was the most accurate commercially produced pendulum clock.[14][15][16][17][18]

Pendulum clocks remained the world standard for accurate timekeeping for 270 years, until the invention of the quartz clock in 1927, and were used as time standards through World War 2. The French Time Service used pendulum clocks as part of their ensemble of standard clocks until 1954 [19] The home pendulum clock began to be replaced as domestic timekeeper during the 1930s and 1940s by the synchronous electric clock, which kept more accurate time because it was synchronized to the oscillation of the electric power grid. The most accurate experimental pendulum clock to date (2007) may be the Littlemore clock, built by Edward T. Hall in the 1990s[20] (donated in 2003 to the National Watch and Clock Museum, Columbia, Pennsylvania, USA).

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pendulum_clock

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19C American Rosewood and Inlaid Regulator Wall Clock.

Provenance: Bought at Auction in Ireland.

Dimensions: 29" Long, 17" Wide at the Dial (The circular dial has a diameter of 17"), 9" Wide at side panels and 4" Deep

Condition: Excellent. It was working perfectly but needs a good servicing.

Price: $1,650.00. Sale Price Now: $1,249.00

 

American Rosewood & Inlaid Wall Pendulum Clock

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19C American Rosewood and Inlaid Regulator Wall Clock (4)

19C American Rosewood and Inlaid Regulator Wall Clock (5)

 

19C American Rosewood and Inlaid Regulator Wall Clock (7)

19C American Rosewood and Inlaid Regulator Wall Clock (8)

19C American Rosewood and Inlaid Regulator Wall Clock (9)

19C American Rosewood and Inlaid Regulator Wall Clock